Talking Point: The Silent Child (film with professional discussion prompts)

A short watch which is thought-provoking and worthy of reflective discussion amongst colleagues.

I use a book club format when using film as a professional reflection tool, with questions to prompt discussion and thinking. For example:

  • What makes up Libby’s world?
  • How does Libby feel?
  • How do her parents feel?
  • What are her parents’ motivations?
  • What has informed her grandmother’s understanding of Libby’s capabilities?
  • How do you think society views people with hearing impairments (current and/or historical understanding)?
  • What is the role of the social worker?
  • Where is the line between state and parental responsibility?
  • What support is available for children with hearing impairments, parents, professionals?
  • What could improve the outcomes of children with hearing impairments?
  • Where does early years education fit in to this?
  • How did the film make you feel?
  • Will the film change your practice? If so, how?

This list isn’t exhaustive but it captures some of the main elements of discussions I’ve had on the film – your team will be different and bring different experiences to the discussion. Let me know if you have any other suggestions to include!

Synopsis: A deaf 4-year-old girl named Libby lives in a world of silence until a caring social worker teaches her to use sign language to communicate.

Watch The Silent Child on BBC iPlayer: https://bbc.in/2qsCIa0

Advertisements

Safeguarding: Pop Quiz

Keeping safeguarding on the agenda (literal or figurative) is one of the most important things we can do to ensure our staff feel competent and knowledgable when faced with concerns about a child’s welfare.Read More »

Summer Continuous Professional Development (CPD)

I thought that perhaps I would theme some blog posts around the official professional development I log during the summer term.
My personal approach to training and extending knowledge has never been “less is more”. Since becoming an early years practitioner (and later a senior early years practitioner) I have adopted the motto of “never be content with practice but strive to be” – this does not mean being negative when reflecting upon practice, instead it is a reminder that a great practitioner is also an industrious learner. All learning need not be formalised or arduous, this term I have Beach Schools training and a messy play workshop planned.