Setting featured in Haylock & Cockburn’s new edition of “Understanding Mathematics for Young Children”

Last June, my setting was fortunate enough to play host to Derek Haylock (an education consultant and author; he worked for over 30 years in teacher education and was Co-Director of Primary Initial Teacher Training, responsible for the mathematics components of the primary programmes at the University of East Anglia in Norwich) whilst he collected observations for the new edition of the popular mathematical education book “Understanding Mathematics for Young Children”.

You can find Mr Haylock’s blog here and the edition that my pre-school is featured in here.

Review to follow.

Synopsis:

“In this indispensable book, the authors help teachers understand mathematical concepts and how children come to understand them, and show how to develop your own confidence with mathematical activities.

Each chapter of this book includes:

– real-life examples and illustrations from children and teachers;

– the research behind some of the concepts and teaching approaches discussed;

– pauses to reflect and discuss your own mathematical knowledge and experience;

– age-appropriate classroom activities to try with your class or group.

This is an essential student text and professional reference work for teachers of children aged 3 to 8 years.”

Derek’s blog post following the visit can be found here.

“On Tuesday I spent half a morning at the [PRE-SCHOOL], on the North Norfolk coast. The main reason for the visit was to talk to Kate Oakley who runs the pre-school and who had some interesting observations to share on the ways in which children in the age range 3 to 5 years engage with mathematics. It was a delight to spend some time with the children as well. It was particularly intriguing and exciting to see how much mathematics they were doing informally through play within a suitably prepared and relaxed environment. The staff let the the younger children take their play in whatever direction they choose but then ensure that opportunities for learning arise by the provision of resources and by focussed conversations and questions.

Here’s an example of one my observations. One 4-year-old girl was walking around on ‘stilts’ – standing on a couple of upturned buckets with strings that she could pull on to keep them in place under her feet. We were looking at the scale on the wall for measuring the children’s height, and she hobbled over to join us. Standing against the wall on her ‘stilts’ she was able to talk about the fact that her height had increased. In this way she was getting an early experience of the key idea of ‘increasing’, which later on she will learnt to connect with counting on and the concept of addition.”

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Closure of the UEA Early Years Professional Status programme

The Early Years Professional Status training programme delivered by the University of East Anglia is scheduled to cease operation by 2013.

The University of East Anglia (UEA) confirmed that the EYPS course would shut as it is operating at a loss.The university states that running EYP training does not feature in its long-term plans for the School of Education and Lifelong Learning, describing a new focus solely on teacher training and research. UEA has shared £3.4m of East of England consortium funding over three years to provide fully-funded EYPS places with no tuition fees. In a statement UEA said, ‘In the current economic climate, it is important for the university to focus on activities that are viable and that embody the values and priorities outlined in our draft corporate plan for the next five years.Unfortunately, the EYPS course has not recruited enough students and is loss-making. In addition, while we recognise the importance of early years education, this course does not chime with the university’s long-term priorities and ambitions.’ The university said that three members of staff were affected by the closure decision and that 29 EYP students who enrolled in January will finish their 12-month course in January 2013 at UEA.

The University of East Anglia said, ‘In terms of alternative provisions in the future, we have told the consortium that we are very happy to liaise with other HE providers in the area to ensure they will have excellent input.’ The Eastern Leadership Centre is the lead organisation for the East of England consortium, with partners University Campus Suffolk, the University of Hertfordshire and Pen Green Research Centre. Emma Slaughter, service leader (EYPS) at ELC, told Nursery World magazine that fully-funded places for EYP training would continue to be provided in Norfolk and that she did not envisage a drop in the number of applications. Following UEA’s decision to withdraw from EYP training, she said, ‘We’ll work collectively to ensure that there is EYPS provision in Norfolk.We’re considering various options for venues, including using children’s centres, local authority offices and other education providers.’

The East of England region is recruiting now for places to start in September. The closing date for applications is the 4th of May.


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